joint wedding toast

The Knot surveyed wedding couples and learned that having a champagne wedding toast was the second top food trend at weddings, followed by a dessert bar, and late night snacks. Only the timeless wedding cake topped it.

Legend has it that this tradition traces back to Shakespearian England days. Guests would dunk stale toast into wine to soften its acidity. Ultimately, the word ‘toast’ was transferred from a piece of bread to the person being toasted, who became the “toast of the town.”

Martha Stewart says you can save money on the Champagne wedding toast

Technically, champagne comes from only one place:  the Champagne region of France, as Martha Stewart Weddings explains:

“The crisp drink, whose name refers only to the varietal made in the Champagne region of France, was first produced in the 17th century with the same in-bottle fermentation process that’s used today. And because supply is so limited, it’s costly.”

To save money, Martha suggests less costly American sparkling wines, such as:

1. Ombra Prosecco. “With its fruity bouquet, this one is amazing in a Bellini,” says Marco Pasanella, owner of New York City wine shop Pasanella & Son. ($14, pasanellaandson.com)

2. Bisson Prosecco. “It’s on the expensive side for Prosecco, but it’s super elegant and bone dry, and the label just looks really cool,” Pasanella says. ($20, pasanellaandson.com)

3. Lamberti Prosecco. “Not only is this a good value, but its attractive light-golden color is nice to look at. It’s full of bright flavor,” says Krafchin. ($14, 67wine.com)

Here’s how to make the ‘champagne’ wedding toast even simpler

However, if you really want to make your celebration simple (and more affordable), you can do what celebrity event planner, Mindy Weiss suggests:

“I rarely have a champagne toast as part of the wedding day. Instead, we have a toast where the guests raise the glass of what they are already drinking. [The champagne itself] is never mentioned or missed. I love that there is the tradition of a toast, but I don’t think that it has to be with champagne. And opting out of passing champagne does save money in the budget.” 

Whether you’re toasting with Champagne, a sparkling wine, cabernet, or pinot, Weiss suggests that …

“All glasses should be filled before the toast begins.”

You are about to become the ‘toast of the town.’ DJ Brian Anderson wishes you congratulations on your upcoming Alabama wedding celebration!

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